Great teams know how to work together. They understand one another’s strengths and weaknesses and are willing to help each other succeed, no matter what the cost. This results in increased productivity and greater enjoyment along the way. A team that’s clear on who they are and what they each do makes it possible for them to switch roles to accomplish the mission. Does this sound like your team?

In The Myth of the Management Team (1990), Harvard’s Chris Argyris says management teams are often full of people who demonstrate “skilled incompetence.”  These are teams of people who continually miss the learning that could be had by careful inquiry and observation if they’d slow down. Instead they miss the significance of events, forces, trends and people around them. Why? This happens because many teams spend too much time protecting turf, maintaining the appearance of cohesion and avoiding true inquiry into the thoughts of others who disagree with them.

What’s the key to a team’s success? It seems counter-intuitive, but teams that work better together and move faster are the ones who intentionally take time to slow down and learn. In other words, they go slower in order to go faster (Strategic Speed, 2010).

Whether you are a well functioning team or a team that needs a little direction, Achata Coaching Inc. offers team coaching focused on the following areas:

  • Team Visioning
  • Strategic Planning
  • Improved Execution of Established Goals
  • Understanding your teams strengths & development areas via MBTI® & CPI 260® workshops. To learn more about these workshops, click here.

Many people think the enemy to getting things done is “out there.” The truth, however, is that many times the enemy is either sitting in your chair or on your team.  If you are considering team coaching, you have taken the first step to improving your team’s performance. Why? Because you’ve slowed down long enough to read this article. If you’re the team leader, you influence the emotional climate of your team as much as 50-70% (The Hay Group, 2003). Why not slow the whole team down for a day or two? In the end, it will make you faster.